oldmanstephanie:

we went on a field trip to the zoo last week

posted 1 day ago · 50,015 notes © oldmanstephanie


charmancler:

who cares about hashtags when there’s hashbrowns

posted 1 day ago · 277,731 notes © charmancler


judymartn:

American Horror Story: Murder House

 A Summary

posted 1 day ago · 132,055 notes © judymartn


Source: judymartn Via: ughmalfoy
posted 1 day ago · 219,284 notes © sizvideos



me on my way to deliver a kiss to u

me on my way to deliver a kiss to u

posted 1 day ago · 237,039 notes © have--not


Source: have--not Via: ageorgeygirl

hellugh:

stoned-levi:

sullivanthere:

I went from this

image

to this

image

at first I thought it was an alternative way to hard-boil eggs… nope…

image

DEAR GOD. PLEASE DON’T SCROLL PAST THIS. IT MAY LOOK LIKE ANOTHER DUMB VIDEO, I THOUGHT SO TOO BUT JESUS PLEASE WATCH THIS. SO FUCKING WEIRD.

REVOLUTION

I want to know who is responsible

posted 2 days ago · 283,929 notes © miles-eggworth
#.... #what


kanyewestismyfather:

if you haven’t heard about melanie martinez you should get into her like NOW. she used to be a contestant on the voice but she’s doing her own thing independently and her new song dollhouse is just PERFECTION

GET INTO IT. BUY IT ON ITUNES. SUPPORT YO FEMALE VOCALISTS

posted 2 days ago · 58,978 notes © kanyewestismyfather


posted 2 days ago · 157,784 notes © neonjungleworld


acquaintedwithrask:

strampunkgear:

foreverdisneynerd:

For Atlantis, Disney needed a new language for the Atlantean people. To do this, Disney hired Mark Okrand, the man who also created the famous Klingon and Vulcan for the Star Trek series. In the Atlantean language, Mark Okrand’s main source for it’s roots and stems of its words are Proto-Indo-European,but as Okrand also described it as being the “tower of babel” or “root dialect” for all languages in the world, he also used ancient Chinese, Latin, Greek, Biblical Hebrew, along with many other ancient languages or their reconstructions. As such, you can actually learn to write and speak the language!

This film is so underrated it hurts.

ah this explains how they understood french and english so well almost instantly… better than the magical wind in Pocahontas that’s for sure

acquaintedwithrask:

strampunkgear:

foreverdisneynerd:

For Atlantis, Disney needed a new language for the Atlantean people. To do this, Disney hired Mark Okrand, the man who also created the famous Klingon and Vulcan for the Star Trek series. In the Atlantean language, Mark Okrand’s main source for it’s roots and stems of its words are Proto-Indo-European,but as Okrand also described it as being the “tower of babel” or “root dialect” for all languages in the world, he also used ancient Chinese, Latin, Greek, Biblical Hebrew, along with many other ancient languages or their reconstructions. As such, you can actually learn to write and speak the language!

This film is so underrated it hurts.

ah this explains how they understood french and english so well almost instantly… better than the magical wind in Pocahontas that’s for sure

posted 2 days ago · 84,038 notes © foreverdisneynerd


lesbianwicce:

during the witch burning times, midwives were targeted because they were healers and they eased the pain of childbirth which was meant to be woman’s punishment for eating the apple in the garden of eden.

birth control and abortion were considered sinful for the same reason.

anti-choice sentiment started because people (men) wanted women to be punished, and these misogynistic ideas have carried on for hundreds of years.

what a sad reflection on our society.



"Is that your book?

It wasn’t always mine.”

The Book Thief (2013)

posted 3 days ago · 619 notes © movingimagenthusiast


jamescookjr:

“When I was auditioning for Joffrey. I only had one audition, and the producers and writers were laughing at my performance because I was being so snotty and arrogant. They found it comical. I thought that was good.” —Jack Gleeson

“Jack is gorgeous – a wonderfully sensitive, quiet, intelligent scholar. He’s the antithesis of that character.” —Michelle Fairley

"Jack, who plays Joffrey is such a lovely fellow." --Ian McElhinney

“He’s this really contemplative, erudite, really gorgeous, generous human being, and he plays Joffrey so well.  It’s very disturbing.” —Natalie Dormer

"Jack Gleeson, who plays Joffrey is an absolute sweetheart in real life, you know what I mean. He’s such a brilliant actor. I think he’s a genius." —Mark Addy

“He’s the most polite, lovely, intelligent person in the whole cast! He’s just so humble and everyone loves him. There’s nothing anyone can say bad about Jack. He literally just turns it on. As soon as they go, “Action!” he goes from lovely Jack to the most sadistic, horrible creep on television.” —Sophie Turner

“Jack Gleeson is really a very nice young man, charming and friendly.” —George R.R. Martin

"I kind of wish he would do more television interviews so that people can see what he’s really like, because there is so much hate for Joffrey, I feel protective of Jack now. If I were him, I’d be petrified that people would come up and slap me on the street! I should be his bodyguard." —Sophie Turner

"Jack is actually a very sweet boy and very bright, very intelligent young man with a natural talent." —Charles Dance

"Jack! He’s the coolest. He smokes a pipe, people. Talk about great acting for somebody who’s so different from the part he plays. I love that guy." —Peter Dinklage

posted 3 days ago · 41,722 notes © jamescookjr


thisandthathistoryblog:

hjuliana:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:


A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.
If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.
Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.
Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL

I found something too awesome not share with you! 
I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same!

thisandthathistoryblog:

hjuliana:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:

A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.

If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.

Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.

Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL

I found something too awesome not share with you! 

I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same!

posted 3 days ago · 119,839 notes © wine-loving-vagabond


today my mom laughed for 30 minutes about this

image

posted 3 days ago · 378,955 notes © loueeh


"If a Disney princess had night terrors, the story of Sansa Stark might be what woke her up screaming. Often overlooked in favor of her killer kid sister, the elder Stark sibling has had all her illusions about the world, and her safety in it, shattered. But her quiet, innate political shrewdness and emotional strength have enabled her to survive in a royal court that likely would have cost every other member of her family their heads. She’s the show’s best-kept secret."
-  Rollingstone about Sansa Stark in their list of top 40 game of thrones characters. Sansa is number 4. x (via tomlincum)
posted 3 days ago · 20,984 notes © tomlincum


Source: tomlincum Via: didyoucount